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Hey Folks, here are food and health tips I’ll be mentioning in class. Some have links, some don’t. Send me an email with topics you’d like to discuss and I’ll do some research and bring it up to everyone!

I have been reading and sharing from the following two books, and various online tidbits that invite me to research them.

Food Rules by Michael Pollan and Eating on the Wild Side by Jo Robinson. Both are amazing and wonderful.

The tips are in order of presentation in class, most recent at the top.

Week of May 15th: Healthy Travel Hacks

Places with lots of people like airports and bust stations are just part of travel. Picking up germs doesn’t have to be. Wash your hands a lot. Here some advice from my acupuncturist. Decrease your risk of airborne bugs by swabbing inside your nose with a Q-tip tipped with antibiotic cream before entering a highly populated area or a plane with recycling air. Repeat a few times per trip. Also, decrease your risk of increased blood pressure or blood clots by lowering your sodium intake while traveling on planes. Avoid salty snacks and bring your own (fresh and dried fruit, raw or toasted nuts and seeds, little tomatoes, radishes, veggie sticks). Another way to decrease stress and viral risk is to avoid sugar which has been associated with decreased immune system function.

Week of May 8th: food choices and cataracts

It seems like lots of fruits and vegetables (high in antioxidants) are key to preventing cataracts, as well as sunglasses to protect the eyes from radiation. Colorful fruits and vegetables and dark leafy greens contain good amounts of Vitamin C and E as well as minerals and  lutein and zeaxanthin. Eating fish with lots of omega-3 fatty acids are associated with prevention also. Overall, high levels of antioxidants in the diet and low levels of simple carbohydrates correlated with better vision. Cataract risks increase with the consumption of fried and sugary foods/beverages as well as high salt and exposure to pollution and cigarette smoke.  Some good research is presented in this article.

 Week of May 1st: Almonds; gassed or steamed?

So it turns out that your almonds are pasteurized if you they originate in the US – almost always CA – and you buy them at the store. There are a number of ways to do this, but the top two are to 1) steam them and then dry them, or  2) fumigate them with a toxic chemical called propylene oxide (PPO) which is a known carcinogen. 

There are downsides to both, but bigger downsides (IMHO) to the carcinogen. Steaming and then hot-air drying the almonds causes a loss of nutrients, so you aren’t getting the vitamins and minerals you think you are. PPO, however has been shown to still exist on almonds up to 300ppm post-process and been associated with respiratory cancer upon inhalation and mucous membrane cancer upon ingestion. You don’t want to know how they found this out, but let’s be glad they did.

So, which brands use which technique? I wondered to myself while munching with sudden trepidation on Trader Joes “raw” almonds. Luckily someone else has also had that thought and done some phoning around to ask.  Both Trader Joes and Whole Foods were quite righteous about fumigation ‘not meeting their standards’ (hooray) and Planters also uses the steam technique. Costco brand and Diamond uses PPO. Blue Diamond (confusingly named) seems to use a mix of techniques.

so GAH. It seems like the best bet for raw almonds/nuts etc. is to get them from companies NOT  in the US that don’t have such draconian pasteurization requirements and can legally sell raw untreated nuts. And since I am avoiding Amazon like the plague due to its disgusting Breitbart connection, I’m going to go here: http://www.terrasoul.com

Let me know if you want to do a group order.

Week of April 24th: Ticks, repelling them with essential oils

So apparently ticks don’t like certain essential oils – you can put these on your skin Lavender, Penny Royal, Eucalyptus, Lemon, and Lemongrass, and not worry as much. You can dilute the oil in a carrier oil and rub it on, or put some in a spray bottle with water and spritz yourself before hiking. Still do tick checks though! And a sticky lint roller will help take insects off your clothes after a hike.

Week of April 10th: Soak your rice

You all know that eating closer to the whole food is better for you, so it goes without saying that if you eat rice, choose the unbleached unprocessed brown kind that still has some fiber  and germ in it. I’m pro-organic too, because ick, chemicals – but that’s up to you. But here’s another thing; pre-soaking your rice (As little as 10 minutes to overnight) will increase it’s digestibility and decrease it’s cooking time.

Grains are dried foods. The soak softens the grain and allows it to cook faster. It also neutralizes phytic acid, which binds and prevents absorption of minerals such as calcium, magnesium, iron, zinc, and copper. This is a big deal for some folks, especially if you are iron deficient. An overnight soak will be conducive to fermentation and cause a pre-breakdown of fibers we cannot digest, making the nutrients in the grain more bioavailable. 

Week of March 27th: Chew on this

One of the best ways to increase your nutrition is to make sure you are actually chewing your food. Nutrition experts say 30 times will liquify each bite. There are numerous reasons for this. 1) This initial digestive process increases the surface area of the food providing more points of digestion. The first enzymatic attack is by salivary amylase, a starch enzyme, so chewing well helps you digest starch. 2) If you are eating meals with lots of fiber (you are, right?) chewing a lot helps breaks the insoluble fibers down so they pass through the gut more freely. This will make your microbiome very happy. 3) Longer duration mastication and slower meals will boost your satiety. We don’t really start to feel psychologically full until after about 20 minutes due to hormonal responses are as well as stretch responses from the stomach. 4) Chewing adequately will decrease the size of particles in your mouth thus decreasing your risk of choking, and the action of chewing sends signals to your stomach and intestine that a meal is on the way. (Bonus info: a glass of water before each meal will lower your ghrelin levels – an appetite hormone. More about Ghrelin and Leptin.)

Week of March 20th: Sweet potatoes vs regular ole’ potatoes

Why choose? Well, a number of reasons, but both types are good for you. Here’s a great page that compares P and SP. However, sweet potatoes (SP) are many times higher in vitamin A than regular potatoes (22000 vs 14!!!) SP’s have more calcium and potassium too. Make sure you buy organic and eat the skin of the tuber which contain more fiber and vitamins than the flesh.

A few other potato facts: Purple potatoes contain 4 X more antioxidants than regular white potatoes due to the anthocyanin pigmentation. Also, yams and SPs are not the same, go for the SP. Yams are not as nutritious. One last word – don’t fry them. It pretty much negates the nutritional value by destroying some of the nutrients and adding unnecessary calories. I make un-fries but tossing SP batons in olive oil, salt and rosemary, (NY Times recipe), then in rice flour  (*my own addition to make them a little crispier, but you can still make them crispy by slicing them thinner and cooking them hotter – play with it) and laying them on a baking sheet to cook at about 350 – 400F until you can poke them easily with a fork. I turn them over once with tongs. Boom. Delicious and nutritious and when I dip them in ketchup it makes me very happy.

Week of March 13: Coconut oil (organic, virgin) uses and benefits

I love this stuff. I use it to replace butter in cookies, sauté shrimp, use it in stir fries and curries occasionally, and I also use it in the massage therapy room. A dentist client says swoosh it through your teeth for up to 20 minutes to decrease dental issues and infections. Have you tried this? It’s almost impossible! Luckily, eating it is good for you too. Here are some more  benefits to coconut oil. Mostly because they are medium chain saturated fatty acids and are metabolized differently, they affect one’s health more positively than animal-derived long-chain saturated fats.  The references from the site are from medical studies reported in the NIH, so they are not unsubstantiated or unscientific claims. Data suggest coconut oil is associated with decreased abdominal fat, and appetite suppression, antibacterial action, and other uses  such as insect repellant and stain remover.

In other uses, I use it as a make-up remover after performances, and as a skin lubricant in the massage therapy studio (for non allergic clients). As with anything you put in/on your body, make sure you get the good stuff. Organic and virgin unrefined coconut oil only.

Week of  March 6th: Coconut Water – health or hype?

Coconut water is all the rage as the new sports drink, and companies are very willing to sell it to you. It’s not a bad choice, but its pretty expensive, and packaging-heavy. It does contain a bit of sodium and potassium and a few carbs, so it can replenish these if you are actively sweating for a period of time. But unless you are an athlete undergoing prolonged exercise, it’s probably not worth the expense if you are already consuming plentiful water and eating a healthy diet. In my opinion, this is just another fad product that is fine to consume, but is likely not going to change the average exerciser’s performance in a major way. If you like it and it helps you stay hydrated, then great! Other (free) hydrations options: make your own sports drink in your own not-trash bottle with a squeezed lemon or lime and a sprinkle of salt. Keep adding water when you get about half-way and the citrus flavor will stay perceptible. Also, looking beyond the market where you buy the product is something we should all do. Where are those coconuts coming from? Are the growers being scammed? How much plastic packaging is around this blob of mostly-water? Buying into marketing hype is a great way of buying into increased environmental damage in many ways, so buyer-be-educated!

Week of Feb 27th: Black Tea

I just returned from visiting my Grandmother in the UK. All English people drink tea, and lots of it. It’s the time-honored response to almost any life event spanning  walking in the door after shopping, to celebrating the birth of a child. You must do it right though; boil the water, warm the pot (very important! Or the cold pot cools the water too much to brew the tea), THEN put the tea in and pour the water on top. THEN, pour the carefully steeped tea into a cup and only after add milk etc. Black and green tea come from the same plant – Camellia Sinensis. Black tea is dried and fermented, whereas green tea is not. There are lots of benefits to drinking black tea. This is due to the amounts polyphenols and catechins (antioxidants) that leach out of the tea leaves into the hot water. Even WebMD is also cautiously optimistic about black tea (1-4 C a day) which says a lot, as scientific organizations are quite mealy mouthed when it comes to dietary benefits of things. If you wish to be completely overwhelmed with tea, Dobra Tea shop has more tea than you could ever hope to consume, with a tome-like menu of tea. But it’s a lot of fun to sit and choose a variety, and then have tea with a friend in such a lovely environment.

Week of Jan 30th: Seaweed – superfood!

It’s worth getting used to the briny flavor of seaweed. Whether its sushi, or toasted nori crumbled onto rice or veggies, seaweed is a low-calorie, nutrient, vitamin and fiber-dense food packed with minerals. (Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin E (Alpha Tocopherol), Vitamin K, Niacin, Pantothenic Acid and Phosphorus, and a very good source of Riboflavin, Folate, Iron, Magnesium, Copper and Manganese. Also Iodine! (Here’s why you should care about Iodine.)
It’s a huge source of Calcium – one of the reasons Asian folks don’t need to eat dairy products. (Strangely humans are the only animals that drink  milk after weaning, even stranger – milk from another animal!)  You can get a little can of crumbled seaweed and sesame seeds to sprinkle on things, just like an herb mixture, or make your own seaweed salad. Info and recipe here. A few more ways to put seaweed into your diet.

Week of Jan 23rd: Another word on vegetarian protein complementationScreen Shot 2017-01-22 at 11.35.39 PM

So I have recently begun eating less animal products. I feel better, feel it has a lesser impact on resources and also it’s easier on my finances. But I wanted to make sure I got all my amino acids. We need 20 of them and must obtain 9/20 from our diet because we cannot manufacture them ourselves. Animal products give us all 20 in one food – meat/dairy/eggs. Vegetable products also give us the 20, but not necessarily all together in high levels (though soy, quinoa, and hemp do).  So we complement the right vegetable-based foods within 24 hours and can get it all in. But here’s the thing, I have learned that eating grains + legumes, or grains + nuts gives us the full complement, but recently was mind-blown that green vegetables have the same complementation ability as grains, with a much lower energy cost. We need to look at nutrient density. Nutrient density is nutrient per calorie instead of nutrient per weight. This means that a nice BIG green salad with various vegetable toppings and toasted walnuts and pumpkin seeds is quite full enough of complete protein for a meal, with tons of fiber and is quite low on the energy budget. Another plant protein chart. Brussels Sprouts, broccoli and spinach are big powerhouses. Hooray! Oh I just found one more article on the misconception of how much protein we ‘should’ be getting. Seems like as long as we are getting a variety of plant foods to meet energy requirements, protein levels are more than adequate. That’s a LOT of vegetables.

Week of Jan 17th: Whats good for the heart is good for the brain

This video by a doctor explains the things that benefit your brain and decrease the risk of Alzheimers. Whats good for the heart is also good for the brain. A mediterranean diet (veg, fruit, nuts, olive oil, less meat, more fish), 7-8 hrs of sleep, lots of social interaction, intellectual challenges, learning new things, and stress management are all beneficial for longevity and brain+heart heath.

Week of Jan 9th 2017: Core <-> Brain Connections

I found this to be an interesting article about how science may have found the pathway between exercise (namely Yoga and Pilates) and stress levels. A skeptical scientist who doesn’t do anything unless its proven to him discovered that neural connections exist between muscles, adrenal glands and the cortex of the brain. Just doing exercise you love (or love to hate) demonstrates that how we move has a direct effect on how we feel, but the actual neural process hadn’t been elucidated. Researchers used a monkey model to observe that the movement control areas of the brain (motor cortex) directly connect to the adrenal glands (site of the flight/fight hormonal response). Thus, the motor area of the brain not only influences movement, but also the stress hormones.

This connection offered a scientific basis for how mental states and brain-muscle connections can alter organ function and stress levels. (Scientific abstract here.)  Well, duh.

*********************** end of 2016!*****************

Week of Dec 12th: Oregano, the oil thereof.

Apart from being all sorts of yummy, oregano has all sorts of great properties. I’ve been using the anti-inflammatory properties this week against a head cold. Carvacrol is its most important component, and is responsible for many of oregano’s health benefits including anti-fungal and anti-viral properties. Carvacrol has powerful antimicrobial properties, and has been shown to help break through the outer cell membranes that help protect bacteria from your immune system. A drop diluted in 4-5 drops of carrier oil like olive, can be used topically for fungal infections or taken internally for about a week for internal infections. You can also put a drop or two in a bowl of boiling water for a steam inhalation . Here are some other uses. Oregano Oil its very expensive, but adding dried or fresh oregano to your food is a cheaper tastier option. Make your own salad dressings, chilis, soups and stuffings with plenty. Heat does not deactivate it’s anti-microbial properties. Plus oregano makes a simple cheesy-toast magically become PIZZA.

Week of Dec 5th: Sobering info on beverages.

Well, bummer. I finally get off refined sugar only to find out that my new treat- yummy red wine, anti-oxidants! heart healthy! – has a few nutritional downsides. One is residual sugar – the fruit sugar left over from the fermentation. A dryer wine will have less, and a sweeter wine more (duh), but on average, a 5 oz pour will give you about 50 calories. And then there’s beer and spirits. Every drink, whether it be beer, wine or liquor (a comparison) is some combination of alcohol calories and sugar calories. Unfortunately, alcohol is more calorically dense (7cal/g) than carbohydrate or protein (4cal/g), coming in under fat (10cal/g). Here’s an article comparing caloric values of wine and beer. So that 5 oz pour of wine will also contain about 100 calories solely from the alcohol, for a total of about 150 cal (50 from the sugar and 100 from the alcohol).

Dammit. Moderation is the most appropriate yet annoying answer.

Week of Nov 28th: Quinoa – vegetarian protein, pros and cons.

Quinoa has long been touted as an addition to a vegetarian diet. It has the full complement of amino acids necessary for humans – an oddity in the plant world – bearing the name “complete protein”. 2013 was actually the year of Quinoa! It also has manganese, iron, copper, phosphorous, vitamin B2, other essential minerals, and seem interesting anti-oxidant phytochemicals. Dr. Weil likes it, so I do too :) There are two recipes in the link. I also use it to make a tabbouleh. Cook it like rice: 1 C of Q to 2 C water. Make sure you wash it first to remove saponins in the outer layer. Don’t soak it, the saponins will leach into the seeds.

Of course, there is another side to everything. (A Mother Jones article that’s interesting.) Quinoa has become so beloved and sought-after in North America that it has become less consumed in home markets in South America. The demand outside of producing countries is now huge, and causing the concomitant environmental issues that commodity crops do.  The good news? Quinoa can be grown in many different climates and should be soon. Buy your quinoa from organic sources and educate yourself so you are supporting small careful agriculture. Bon appetit!

Week of Nov 21st: Magical Mushrooms!

No not those. The ones you cook with. These fabulous fungi have some serious nutritional values.  According to Medical News Today, mushrooms have lots of antioxidants (the chemicals that help reduce pre-cancerous changes in your body), selenium (good for skin, immune system and is anti-inflammatory) and vitamin D (did you know that mushrooms produce vit D just like human skin does?) Sunshine mushrooms are going got be a thing. Mushrooms also have quite a lot of fiber (the soluble kind, beta-glucan, like oats) which lowers blood sugars and LDL cholesterol and boosts the feeling of satiety; fullness and satisfaction. They are also very low in calories, though high in nutrients. Here’s a link to stuffed mushrooms.

 Week of Nov 14th: Devils advocate, some debunking.

Some foods recently have been labelled ‘superfoods’ and touted as the next best thing, mostly because someone wants to make some money. Surprise. Though the nutritional values and effects of many foods are helpful, the marketing can be a bit hyperbolic. The kinda-gullible, silver-bullet-seeking, less-than-stellar-scientifically-educated general public is easily swayed with exaggerated claims to health. This article throws some cold water on all the Superfood hype and scientists tell us to calm down a bit when presented with this kind of hype.

Though apparently apples, blueberries, salmon and red wine are pretty darn good for you. YAY! (And avoid orange juice which is mostly sugar, and gluten-replacement products unless you truly are gluten sensitive as determined by a 2-week elimination diet.)

Week of Nov 7th: Fermented foods – what and why?

There are a number of reasons fermented foods (yogurt, sauerkraut, kefir, tempeh, kimchee etc…) are becoming known as superfoods. Where did they come from? One of their properties is that they are harvested foods prepared for storage that can be held safely at room temperature. Fermented foods have bacteria and yeasts in them (known as probiotics), either naturally occurring or inoculated, that have been allowed to eat part of the food to create an acid and some alcohol byproducts. This causes the characteristic flavor and properties of the food. When we consume the fermented food, we not only eat the original substrate, but also the bacteria and yeast population, which have an effect on our internal flora. The probiotics can break down cellulose making the food more digestible and also give off their own byproducts, which we need for good health.  We also have an internal microflora in our intestines that provides nutrients and vitamins, and eating certain foods (fiber) keeps them happy. For example Vitamin K which we desperately need for blood clotting, is entirely a product of our gut bacteria.

 

Week of Oct 31st: curry spices are good for you!

I was having a conversation with a friend of mine who travels to India a lot. He said he was boggled about the fact that they rarely ate fresh vegetables in the district he visits (Chennai), but that people’s health seems to be less impacted than one might think. While we ruminated on the reasons why (as we chomped down local and delicious salad greens) he postulated that they eat a LOT of curries (i.e. spices) and fermented foods, and that might be a major source of their vitamins and minerals instead of plant sources. This week, I’ll focus on spices, specifically those found in curry powders. Firstly lets, define spice: “A spice is a seed, fruit, root, bark, berry, bud or other vegetable substance primarily used for flavoring, coloring or preserving food. Spices are distinguished from herbs, which are parts of leafy green plants used for flavoring or as a garnish” – Wikipedia. 

I spoke a while ago about turmeric and black pepper, but there are many other spices in curry powders that are in the antioxidant spectrum. One researcher (originally from India) is quoted as saying “…when Indians move away and adopt more Westernized eating patterns, their rates of those diseases rise. While researchers usually blame the meatier, fattier nature of Western diets, other experts believe that herbs and spices—or more precisely, the lack of them—are also an important piece of the dietary puzzle. When Indians eat more Westernized foods, they’re getting much fewer spices than their traditional diet contains,” he explains. “They lose the protection those spices are conveying.” Turmeric, chili pepper, ginger, cinnamon, and black pepper, among other spices found in curry powders all have antioxidant properties, and a little goes a long way. Another idea put forward in this article is that :” adding spices and herbs seems to reduce the harmful by-products formed in cooked meat that may lead to cancer.”

The best idea for curry powder is to make your own, with ingredients bought separately from a bulk spice section. That is a labor of love, but little jars of homemade curry powder do make great gifts at holiday-time. You can also adjust the ingredients to personalize it. It doesn’t have to be hot at all, just simply very flavorful. Another option is to buy curry powders and pastes that are fresh and vibrant and are not near their expiration date. One of my favorite recipes is Kitcheree – the Indian vegetarian version of nurturing chicken-soup-like food .

Week of Oct 24th – Good news for cheese, glorious cheese – eat the real thing!

Eating real – not fat-reduced (ugh, shudder) cheese is the way to go. Not only is it just plain taster, real full fat cheese has been found not to be the villain it was once portrayed. It had fallen victim to the myth of fat being the causative agent of cardiovascular disease, which is coming around to being disproven by much research. It’s hard not to believe something that has been touted as truth for so long – “fat is bad for you!!” But so many articles are coming out to repoint the finger not at fat, but at sugar as the true culprit in cardiovascular disease. In an article from the American Society of Nutrition,  delicious full-fat real food cheese is being led back into the light as a food that is not dangerous – if eaten moderately (as with any food). The study where folks ate 2.5 oz of cheese daily compared with reduced fat cheese or a carbohydrate snack, concluded that regular full fat cheese does not change risky blood markers such as LDL cholesterol, and in a few cases actually raised HDL (good) cholesterol.  Another study in rats suggests that a diet containing real cheese decreases fat build up in the liver. One more paradoxical fact – It’s an overabundance of carbohydrate in the diet, NOT saturated fat, that causes hormonal insulin upheaval and increased blood lipid levels associated with diseases like Diabetes-2 and Metabolic Syndrome according to a study in Lipid Technology journal.

YAY!  So be able to recognize how much an ounce of cheese is (the size of 2 dice) and enjoy a reasonable 2-3 oz a day.

 

Week of Oct 17th – Acai – how the heck do I pronounce it, and what does it do?

Well, first of all: the word is Portuguese, so say A-sai-ee. The Acai berry comes from central and south America and is reddish purple. Because of their deep pigmentation, they have been touted as the next super-berry, having possibly more antioxidant properties than other berries. There’s not enough research to support that, but they likely are up there with the others. They also contain fiber and healthy oils. There are some warnings about high levels of acai messing with the medications for kidney disease, high cholesterol and diabetes, but then there are others that feel that acai is protective. Web MD is meh about them. Other sources think they are as great as Goji.

Until more research is in, I’d treat it like just another berry. Don’t go overboard and enjoy it a another way of getting more fruits and vegetables into your diet. Also, the more processed it is, the lower the nutrition, so read labels and watch for additives.

Week of Oct 11 and 12th – Walnuts!

I think I eat some walnuts everyday. The things are amazing (article here). Low GI, full of fiber, minerals, antioxidants, anti-inflammatories and omega-3s, easily available, great for your cardiovascular system, reduced diabetes, cancer and metabolic syndrome risks,  and grown in the USA. Buy them in bulk (faster store turn-over, therefore fresher) and smell/taste them before you pay. The oils in raw walnuts can go rancid easily – then YUK. They are also heavenly when toasted – but only toast the right amount just before you use them. Toasting walnuts destabilizes the oils so they’ll go rancid faster. I keep mine raw and in the freezer. Oh, and apparently, the skins are the healthiest part :) surprise. So don’t discard them, throw them into whatever you’re eating too.

Walnuts are great on top of salads, yogurt, mixed into savory grains or stuffings, thrown into smoothies, trail mixes,  part of crumble toppings, muffins etc.etc.etc. and My favorite: eaten raw with apples and a sharp cheese.

Week of Oct 3rd – Goji Berries – so what’s the big deal?

So as usual, the Chinese have been eating these berries and deriving benefits from their nutritional properties for centuries before us. Gojis, like many berries have lots of fiber, vitamins, iron and carotenoids, but also are the only fruit containing all essential amino acids for humans. They also contain many minerals, and are credited with increasing alertness. They can be eaten raw, dried or reconstituted. Some website articles tout them as the second coming. Others are more conservative. I found them at Whole Foods, but likely Asian food stores will have them too. They are contraindicated if you are taking Warfarin/other blood thinners (apparently Gojis are a natural anticoagulant), or blood pressure medications. Hmm, that maybe a LOT of Americans. Everything we take in interacts inside us, so if you are on medications, it’s good to ask your medical professional about possible food/drug interactions. A moderate amount of any food won’t make a big difference, but many folks think, well if a little is good, MORE IS BETTER. (Of course, not true.)

But on the whole, it seems like Goji berries are a tasty interesting bigger-nutritional-bang-for-the-buck dried fruit addition and could replace the higher sugar-less nutritious ubiquitous and boring raisin or sugar-coated dried cranberry (try and find a dried cranberry thats not – let me know if you do!)

Week of 9/26/16: Big Sugar and the cover up.

So in the annals of not surprising news….This from NPRThe authors of the new Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) article  say that for the past five decades, the sugar industry has been attempting to influence the scientific debate over the relative risks of sugar and fat.  Current science has discovered that processed sugar intake is more involved in heart disease than fat, but it took years of sugar business lying and people dying for this to become clear. “Policymaking committees should consider giving less weight to food industry-funded studies,” they write. (Well, duh.)

Kinda like the tobacco industry casting doubt on the toxicity of cigarettes and fossil fuel producers denying climate change. If there is money to be made, a cover up will be created until it is too late and people pay with their lives. The take-home? Educate yourself. Read, don’t take my word for it, explore, challenge and take charge of your own diet and habits. No one really cares more than you do about your own health. There. Rant over. (for now.)

Week of 9/19/16: Eat your peels (thats where the goods are)

Did you know that most of the fiber and antioxidant properties of plant foods are found in the peels? (An article here). Colorful outer surfaces of plants come from pigments that are very beneficial to our health (flavonoids, carotenoids). Also, plants cannot run from predators and pests that want to eat them, so they  use chemicals and barriers to repel attackers. Fibrous rinds and bitter chemicals are the ones that help us stay healthy: antioxidants, anthocyanins, theobromides and cellulose and are located on the outsides of the plants where pests attack first. So if you remove the peels from the vegetables and fruit, you are removing most of their beneficial qualities. The flesh of the fruit/veggie is not as nutritious.

What? So #1) This means buy organic, because those peels are going to keep you healthier if there are fewer pesticides sprayed on them. #2) How? Throw the whole washed unpeeled fruit into the smoothie. Wash the veggie and leave the peel on before slicing and dicing, or cooking. Make a stock with the outsides of the veggies.

Week of 9/12/16: Water (no really)

So ya know, water really is a big deal. In many health programs, drinking water is advocated. No  surprise there. I mean, we are 60-70% water so drinking enough keeps us hydrated and in the right biochemical and PH range. But, apparently, drinking 500 ml (2 C)  will boost your metabolism for about 30 min by about 30%. here’s the article. When I did the math, this means if you drink about  6′ish C of water a day, you’ll burn approx 50 cal, which by the end of the year is equivalent to the caloric value of of 5 # of fat. That you didn’t store. Hello and goodbye midlife midsection creep.

Hmmmmm. I’ll try and do it. What’s the worst that can happen? (OK, peeing a lot.) I’ll have to put alarms on my iPhone to remind me to drink!

May 23rd: Trans-Fatty Acids, what are they and why they are not so great.

Fats occur in long chains of carbon atoms (C) with hydrogen (H) sticking off the sides like a big centipede. If a fatty acid (FA) has as many H as possible and no more can fit on, it’s logically called ‘saturated’. If there is space to fit one more on, it’s called “mono-unsaturated’.  If there are more vacant spaces; “polyunsaturated”. Fully saturated chains are even and straight, and stack nicely against each other like cord wood, so that they are solid at room temperature (Many animal fats fall into this category – lard, butter, and some plants: avocado and coconut for example.) Unsaturated chain have kinks and bends in them and they don’t stack well, acting a bit higgledy piggledy, and so are more liquid at room temperature (Plant fats such as olive oil come to mind). If you take an unsaturated fatty acid and with a chemical reaction, forcibly add hydrogen, you can stick them on to saturate the molecule, but this forced process does not create a normal FA. The forcibly-added H’s stick onto the target FA in strange places, creating weird shapes that your body’s enzymes doesn’t know quite how to handle. Usually we digest fats that are cis (same side), and this forced reaction, or hydrogenation, creates trans – (opposite sides). Hence the term “trans fats”.

Why the heck would we create and sell foods by this process that are hard to digest or even harmful? Economics. These trans-fats have the stability of normal saturated FA’s at room temperature, but are much cheaper to produce. Growing and processing plant oils are cheaper than growing animals. A ‘pastry’ (and I use this term loosely) made with processed fats and other processed ingredients will last much longer on the shelves. Think Twinkies. The reason they last so long is that the microbes that cause the breakdown of food won’t touch them, and it they don’t, neither should you. Don’t eat anything that comes in cellophane or that you buy at a 7-11.

Eat real food that will eventually biodegrade.

May 16/17: Eat Slowly (Food rule by Michael Pollan)

I am the first person who needs to heed this advice. I frequently arrive home hungry and am therefore prone to unwisely stuffing things into my face as fast as possible. Or I multitask and eat while _____. Oops. I also seem to simply eat faster than most. Why is this? Eating should be a pleasure, not an inconvenience to get through quickly and move on to other things. In other news (unsurprisingly) slower meals tend to result in better digestion and absorption of nutrients, as well as lower caloric intake. Also, more fluids (OK, maybe wine) tend to be also taken in, and the satisfaction rating of a meal goes up (read this article). Slower food consumption allows the body to register satiety through stomach stretch receptors and hormonal responses as food enters the small intestine. After about 20 minutes, your body will signal satiety. Faster eating will pack a lot more calories into that time frame. Put your fork down. Drink some water. Talk to someone sitting next to you. Taste instead of wolf your food. Also, chew more. Be grateful (for all sorts of things). It will make a difference in your consumption and your health.

I tend to rush around, and eating is no exception. It takes a lot to be mindful, and I’m trying to slow down everywhere in my life. I am playing a game with myself, trying not to be the first one finished if I’m eating with friends. Other helpful ideas?

May 10th: Antihistamines and local honey

‘Tis the season to be sneezy. At least for me, hence: antihistamines. They help get me through the day. I’m not thrilled about taking these, since they could have considerable side effects: DizzinessDry mouthDry eyes, Blurred vision, Problems urinating, Constipation, Mental disturbances (Whaaa?! – these descriptions are taken from a website), and they can also be sedating if you don’t choose the right one for you. I use Fenofexadine (generic Allegra) since Loratidine  (generic Claritin) stopped working for me a while ago. Luckily, I notice none of the above side effects, but I do notice a decrease in my energy and strength, a scratchy throat and a bit of distraction. On the other hand, I can see and breathe. I’ll take it.

Natural antihistamines are more gentle, though may not really tamp down the debilitating effects of a big ole’ allergic reaction. But one could try local honey about a month before allergy season to give yourself a little dose of allergens that will be floating towards you. I do this, and in any event it tastes nice. Exercise always works for me because of the adrenaline response and blood flow that flushes the tissues and decreases circulating histamines. A Neti pot/salt water snuffle will rinse allergens off nasal membranes, and a shower seems to make me feel better too. Something about rinsing off a layer of possible allergens. I make sure to not allow the first dose of water from my hair to run into my eyes.  That happened once in mid allergy season and whammo. Instant itchy eyes. There are some other options, but really, for the short period of time one needs antihistamines (hay fever season) I tend to just go with the big pharmaceutical guns and drink lots of  water after to flush things out of my system.

May 9th: Don’t be bitter, eat bitter! Or bitterness in food is good for you.

So, remember when I first started the nutrition nuggets and we talked about phytonutrients? These are the defense mechanisms of a static organism. Plants cannot run away, so they use chemicals with strong flavors and colors to warn away predators. These chemicals in plants that are colorful, pungent, bitter, astringent and  strong are some of the healthiest chemicals to eat, and have been found to decrease the risk of many human diseases (cancer, heart disease, diabetes, etc.) In extremely high amounts, these chemicals may be toxic, but humans don’t eat enough plant material for phytochemicals to be other than beneficial. This has been proven many times. Unfortunately, the current western palate has been blanded down, sweetened and salted so bitter-tasting foods are avoided, to our detriment. There is lots of evidence to suggest that foods with bitter properties (dark leafy greens, cocoa, cruciferous vegetables, citrus juices and rind among others) are good for us, and that we need to develop a more adult, open, and gourmet palate to include foods others than the simply sweet and salty that attract and satisfy our inner child.

An easy and interesting way to add bitter greens to your diet is by mixing some tender bitter green leaves to your regular lettuce salad (arugula, escarole, baby kale, dandelion, watercress…here is a list of some more) so the flavors become more familiar and pleasant to eat. You can also lightly sauté any of the greens with a little olive oil or butter and some salt. Throw them into soups – at the end so they don’t over cook. Many of the beneficial chemicals are heat-sensitive.

May 3rd: Cocoa and Cardiovascular benefits

So Jerrie gave me a flyer for a seminar entitled The Pharmacy in Your Kitchen. Since I cannot go, I have been following up on some of the ideas that it presents. One is how COCOA is involved in decreasing the risk of cardiovascular disease. Before you get all excited – cocoa is NOT the same as chocolate. Chocolate is derived from cocoa, but has lots of added sugar and milk. We’re talking about dark high % chocolate, aka, bittersweet, or bitter. Actually it is the chemicals in cocoa, known as polyphenols, catechins (see the green tea nugget) and flavonol families that are the important actors here. The mechanism is still a bit murky, but they decrease inflammation (betcha didn’t see that one coming) of the blood vessel internal surface and reducing free radicals. If you are in a scientific frame of mind, this is a really good article from the medical journal Circulation.

To use Cocoa in your meal preparations, buy a good brand of unsweetened organic Cocoa, and put scoopfuls in smoothies with fruit or stevia, or you can make healthy truffle balls (recipe here). Or get really dark chocolate  (70%+… I prefer 85%), just avoid the sugar and go for the unadulterated cocoa hit. The other benefit of acclimatizing to bitter versions of chocolate is that you don’t have to share as much. By the way, did I mention my birthday is May 16th?

May 2nd: Salad Magic

One of the healthiest meals can be a big salad with lots of fresh local greens and various other vegetables. You can make it even more interesting by varying toppings and dressings. Here are some suggestions: Crumbled cheese, toasted nuts or seeds (walnuts, flax etc.) leftover roasted vegetables or caramelized onions, canned or smoked fish. A 3-bean, grain or lentil salad can go onto of a green one very nicely. Make interesting dressings with miso (see below)  or a lemon tahini dressing. One of my favorites is a curry dressing. I toss cooked lentils, tuna or sardines with any dressing and then put that combo over top of the greens. YUM. Total protein and fiber and deliciousness. Remember to combine your vegetarian proteins if you are going that way. (See Mar 30 nugget)

April 18th: Fermented Foods – Probiotics

Probiotics have been associated with calming and improving Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Crohns, colitis, may protect you from colds and flu and help you have a healthy microbiome (the microorganisms that live in our guts and keep us healthy).  Probiotics are foods that contain bacteria we already have in our guts and can stabilize a precarious intestinal situation, or re-colonize after an anti-biotic one. Hint: don’t take anti-biotics and pro-biotics at the same time. The antis will kill the probios, and the pros will muffle the action of the antibios.

Fermented foods include: unsweetened** yogurt and kefir, kimchi, sauerkraut, miso. Make sure your miso stays unboiled or you’ll kill the beneficials, so add it last and to slightly cooled soup, or use it as a base in a salad dressing. Taste before you add salt, because miso can be salty.) Make sure any product says ‘live active cultures”. The Farmers Market is a great place to pick up yummy healthy and freshly fermented foods. Also, my friend Alex Lewin has written a fantastic book about it: Real Food Fermentation. You can borrow it if you want.

April 12th: Foods that work similarly to NSAIDS (aka Aspirin and Ibuprofen)

NSAIDS (Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatories) function by inhibiting prostaglandins which increase inflammation in the body. The following foods and spices do the same thing, (article) but don’t disturb digestion the way that NSAIDS do. They may not immediately work for a headache, but might be more appropriate for more chronic systemic inflammation associated with (well, EVERYTHING, but…) arthritis, IBS, heart disease, chronic pain, fever etc. Plus they are all YUMMYDELICIOUS and should be part of our diet anyway.

Omega-3 fatty acids (flax, fish, nuts green leafys)… Green TeaSpices (including ginger, turmeric and black pepper, curry powder, dried dill, oregano, paprika, rosemary, mustard, thyme, and also almonds, apricots, dates, raisins, green peppers, olives and mushrooms…Red Wine (yay!)… Basil which contains ursolic acid, also found in cranberries, elder flower, peppermint, rosemary, lavender, oregano, thyme, prunes and the skin of apples (so buy organic apples and wash, don’t peel.)

 April 11th: Food Rule by Michael Pollan

- Do not eat foods that lie to your body.

This goes back to “eat real food”. It has been shown that artificially sweetened foods and beverages are not really associated with weight loss, and may actually go the other way. Why? The hypothesis is the psychology of rewarding one’s self later with higher-calorie food due to the (erroneous) perception of previously virtuous decisions. Another proposed mechanism is that fake sweets disrupt/fool our brain’s ability to gauge actually caloric content of foods.

April 4,5 – Good Egg and Bad Cholesterol

Eggs have had a bad rap in the past, mostly because of the cholesterol issues. Actually, humans have cholesterol issue and project it onto unfortunate food groups, like eggs (Harvard School of Public Health article). Firstly, we need cholesterol to live. They are integral parts of our cell membranes, and the precursor to am number of important molecules like sex hormones. Because of it’s importance, our livers make it and the amount it makes is genetically predetermined. Some of us make more than others. The amount we eat does not affect our blood cholesterol levels as much previously thought, in fact exercise, fiber and water intake affect blood cholesterol numbers more. This is great news for eggs and other yummy and healthy foods. we’re back to “Just eat a varied balanced diet within an intelligent caloric budget and get lots of exercise and water.”

So lets chat a little about cholesterol (“good and bad”) and demystify  those weird numbers. More soon…

March 30th: Protein – complete and incomplete

We don’t need huge amounts – usually about 60 grams daily, but we do need good quality protein with the right complement of all 21 amino acids. We make some, but some  (9) we MUST get from our food. These are called the essential amino acids (EAA’s). We easily derive these EAA’s from animal protein because they are most like us in make up. Yes, you are made of meat. Other complete sources are dairy, fish, and eggs. Vegetarians need to be a little more careful, because most of our food plants only have partial arrays of the EAAs we need, so we nee dot do come food combining. You can do this within a 24 hr period. So nuts or legumes must be combined with  grain. Usually about in a 1:2 ratio. Many vegetarian cultures have done the work for you: Beans and rice,  or lentils and rice/grain, nuts and grain. There are also a few complete vegetarian proteins: Soy and quinoa being the most well know and available. Amaranth, hemp, chia seeds and spiraling are others, but you’ shave to eat quite a bit to get 60 g of protein.

Another thing to think about regarding your food consumption ‘footprint’ – as if all this stuff wasn’t enough – is what are you really supporting with your eating habits? Are (holier than thou) vegetarians really making the planet better vs carnivores? I have issues with this. My thinking, and one that follows along with an interesting (rather angry) book called The Vegetarian Myth by Lierre Kieth, is such that: if you are eating foods that caused destruction of an ecosystem – like soy mono crops in the American west – how is your vegetarianism helping the planet really? Wouldn’t it be better to eat food from local sources that include good stewardship of the earth, ethical treatment of meat animals and a way of farming that improves the soil rather than depletes it (as mono cropping does)? I feel strongly about ecology, so don’t get me started unless you’re in the mood for a tirade, but I buy most of my food at the farmers market when I’m not working on my local farm in N Yarmouth during the season. It goes without saying that I eat organically, and my food budget is actually quite modest and I have very little trash. These are choices that are relatively easy to make if you can give the Standard American Diet the old heave-ho. Plus I feel GREAT.

March 23rd: Trash in, trash out: A 24 hr challenge for you all.

So in trying not to trash our internal environment: our bodies, Here’s another thing to try – not trashing our external one either. Considering we live embedded within it. Landfills do not remove our trash, as much as relocate it out of sight and therefore out of mind. But It’s all still there. Not decomposing. So, here’s my question: have you had a really good look at what you are throwing away? Read this article, and then try to go for 1 DAY (or more) without throwing anything away. Recycling and composting are OK. Think of some life hacks you could implement to reduce your trash stream – bulk places, farmers markets, sources for veggie/fruit bags (I sewed my own out of mesh nylon – they go in the washer). Share your findings with us; on the Facebook page, in class, or email me. I’d love to hear them.

(We even got into a deeply frank conversation about toilet paper last Wednesday. My answer to that? Get a bidet. Simple, the swing arm attaches to the toilet, and much more hygienic than toilet paper. Here’s the link to the Amazon GoBidet. Best $150 I ever spent. Plus there’s a youtube setup video - I used it -  works great. I’m also happy to help you install it – just ask.)

March 21st: Real Food, Real Money, Real Time:

“I can’t afford to eat healthy.”  You can’t afford not to, IMHO.(from this very interesting article). Yes, On the surface, fresh food costs a little more than processed,and takes a bit more time to prepare, but the costs associated with not eating quality real food are much greater.  A 2012 Population Health Management study reported that eating an unhealthy diet puts you at a 66% increased risk of productivity loss. Not to mention the hospital and medication costs of diabetes, obesity, cancer and heart disease, the risks of which can be reduced by eating a healthful diet.

Also, in terms of time, a sedentary lifestyle is linked to greater overall illness. Processed food is faster to prepare than fresh, resulting in a superficial savings of time. BUT, according to the article, US adults spend over 2 hrs a day watching TV, hence being sedentary, not cooking, interacting, or being creative. If you gave yourself back 1 of those hours, what might you accomplish? What healthy delicious wonders could you create for yourself in the kitchen? Anecdote from my own life: I recently went for an eye check up. The ophthamologist said: “There is nothing we can do to improve your amazing 20:15 vision” The result of which was a LASIK surgery I underwent in 2001. I credit my continuing eye health, as well as the rest of me to my constant movement. I plan to never stop moving. As a friend in his 50′s said to me recently (while catching up to me on a bicycle) : “I’m at the stage of life where if I stop doing something, I will stop doing it forever, so the best bet is to NOT STOP.”

Amen to that, dude.

March 16th: Corny ideas

Corn is not one of the most nutrient-dense foods, but you can make some choices that will up the ante. 1) Buy organic. Conventionally, this crop is heavily sprayed with pesticides. 2) Buy it in season for best flavor. After a few hours of picking the sugars are already turning to starch. Shipping takes days. 3) Steam it; boiling will cause most nutrients to leach into the water. 4) Frozen organic corn has pretty much the same nutrient profile as fresh, since its frozen at the top of it’s game.  5) When available buy colored corn. More colors = more healthy phytonutrients.

March 15th: Spring a Leek!

Leeks are a member of the allium family and most of their nutritive qualities are in the green parts – the bits that we tend to throw away. Avoid this by buying the smallest leeks you can find – they will be the most tender. Cut them in half lengthwise and rinse them well to wash out any sand trapped between the leaves. Eat all of it.  use them as you would onions, or sauté and serve them as a side dish.

March 14th: A lovely bunch of (complicated) carrots

Raw carrots vs cooked ones? Well, it’s not that simple. It comes down the vitamin you are aiming for. Vitamin C or Vitamin A? Folate? Carotenoids?  Raw carrots will have more Vit C and Folate, but cooking them a little and serving with a bit of fat/oil will boost availability and absorbability of carotenoids. Carrots are not the most Vit C’ful vegetable you might choose – better to go for citrus or a fresh sweet pepper. But carrots are a great source for Vit A and retinol. Apparently gently “thermally processed” (Really?  We can’t just say ‘cooked’?)  carrots make the pre-vitamin A molecule more bioavailable. So when I want to eat hummus and carrots, I gently steam the carrots a little first until they are toothsome, or al dente.

To me, this seems like  a good  middle ground. Just enough heat to brea down some cell walls and release the carotenoids and pre-A, but not too hot to destroy the B and C. A bit of lipid; tahini, olive oil, or salad dressing will dissolve the fat-soluble vitamins to boost bioavailability.

March 9th – In sight; in stomach. Kitchen hacks.

According to a study, The more time you spend at home, the more important it is to hide the food, because we eat what we see. Take food, especially snack foods and cereal, off the counter. Replace it with a bowl of fruit. Rearrange your cupboard and fridge so that the healthiest food is what you see first. Apparently, women (not men, strangely) with chips or breakfast cereal arranged on their counters were more likely to be 8# or 21#s heavier than women in the same city who didn’t.

March 7th – scallions and chives

Scallions and chives both pack nutritional punches, especially garlic chives.  Put them into everything right at the end, just before serving, or mix them into burgers, throw them on soups and salads and into sandwiches. They are easy to grow in pots in your kitchen or close by in your garden. I have tons of organic onion chives (the tubular kind) so I suggest a chive exchange once they start growing in the spring.

March 2nd – Eat onions that make you cry

The chemicals that give strong onions their bite and fire are the most beneficial to our health. No wishywashywallawallas or vapidvidalias for us. So put on the goggles and attack! You can also cut the onions underwater or put some vinegar on your chopping board to reduce the fumes. Luckily, they are removed once you start to cook the onions, and cooked onions are just as healthy as raw, so make up  batch of caramelized onions, put them on cookie trays in a thin layer, then break them into chunks and keep them frozen until you wish to thaw them for omelets or throw them into soups/stews.

Feb 29th – Onion and garlic skins – really?

Turns out that the outsides of fruits and vegetables are pretty nutritious. Anti-oxidant phytochemicals concentrate at the surface to repel would-be attackers. This can be to a consumer’s benefit if we actually consume the skins and peels of said veggies. (It goes without saying that I recommend ORGANIC produce ONLY, and wash it well.) So onion and garlic skins are quite nutritious – this was news to me – but they are a bit weird and unpleasant to eat. You can simply toss them into your veggie stock pot to add their antioxidants to your soup stock, or crush them into a big tea ball/tie them in some muslin and throw them into soups or stews for easy retrieval. Since I use red onions mostly, this makes for quite a vibrantly colored stock. Woo hoo!

I keep a ziplock in my freezer where I toss all my veggie ends and once it is full, throw the whole thing into my crock pot for a while to make veggie stock. Throwing onion and garlic skins in there instead of the compost is simple. once the stock is made, then everything goes in to the compost anyway, but I get to consume the bionutrients in the stock.

Feb 25th – Food rules by Michael Pollan

# 13 Shop the peripheries of the supermarket and stay out of the middle

# 14 Eat only foods that eventually rot.

Feb 8 – Portland Water; Chlorine and Chloramination

From the Portland Water District: “This facility began treating water in February 1994 using ozone. Ozone is a powerful disinfectant that kills potentially harmful microorganisms and is 99.99% effective against viruses and Giardia. Treatment includes screening, ozonation, UV light treatment, chloramination, and corrosion control. Also as a result of a citizen referendum, fluoride is added to the water at the plant to promote dental health.”

So, the difference between chlorination (Cl) and chloramination (Cl-Am – my shorthand), is that Cl will dissipate from water left overnight on the counter, and that Cl-Am will not. At the levels used for disinfection of public water, the Cl-Am is not dangerous to humans, but apparently will kill fish in your aquarium. How comforting. Best way to remove it if you want: a water filter. Which then go into landfills. sigh.

Feb 1,2,3 – Food Rules by Michael Pollan

#2: Don’t eat anything your (great)grandmother wouldn’t recognize as food (feel free to borrow a Mediterranean Grandmother)

#5: Avoid foods that have some sort of sugar (or sweetener) listed among the top three ingredients.

#9: Avoid food products with the word “Lite” or the terms “Low-fat” or “Non-fat” in their names (usually hugely over-processed)

Wednesday  Jan 27th – Green tea with lemon

Green tea has a lot of antioxidants, but adding a squeeze of lemon to your tea will boost the bioavailability of the catechins even more. From Dr. Andrew Weil.

Tuesday Jan 26th: Black- Blue- and Raspberries – fresh vs cooked vs frozen.

All berries are wonderful raw. Interestingly (and thank goodness), Blueberries don’t lose too much of their antioxidant activity when they are cooked. Well, actually, some is lost, such as Vit C, but others such as quercitin increase in bioavailability after cooking – yay pies! Raspberries and blackberries however, retain more antioxidants when they are eaten fresh. Luckily, freezing all 3 types of berries don’t cause appreciable decline in antiox activity. Freeze them after picking on cookies sheets, then tumble them all into little ziplock bags. You just have to thaw them quickly. Toss the blueberries directly into something you are cooking, or quickly toss the rasp/blackberrybaggie into some warm water until they are thawed. Don’t let them sit around in the fridge to thaw. To cook or not to cook is of course dependent on the type of fruit/veggie and the cooking method. Some more berry lore.

Monday Jan 25th: Turmeric, Black pepper

So turmeric (that fabulously golden powder used in many East Indian dishes) has been touted as an excellent anti-inflammatory and has been implicated in decreasing risk for all sorts of things including arthritis, cancer and Alzheimers. However, what doesn’t seem to be common knowledge is that if it is mixed with a small amount of ground black pepper, it become about 2000X more bioavailable. The piperin in the black pepper inhibits the metabolization of the curcumin in the turmeric and allows it to get on with it’s anti-inflammatory activity.  More info here: Article of interest. Most curry powders already have the pepper mixed with the turmeric. Also, curcumin is fat-soluble, so taking your turmeric with coconut oil or ghee, or another fat as well as black pepper is a winning combo. (Like making a curry: Ta Dah – food as medicine). Just turmeric capsules may not have any pepper, and likely no fat either, so you’d have to add some if you are taking just the capsules. Not much pepper is needed, less than a 1/4 t.

I have been experimenting with a delicious Golden Tea or Milk. Whole milk will provide the fat-solubization of the curcumin. recipe HERE. And a simple chicken curry HERE. (I’d add 2 teaspoons more turmeric, and use brown rice instead of white).

Wednesday Jan 20th/2016: Resistant Starch (RS), and cooked n cooled potatoes and pasta

Starchy foods like pasta and potatoes contain a linear type of starch that we digest easily, causing a high glucose  load and insulin response after a meal (high GI). When these two foods (rice and lentils too) are cooked then cooled, the starch reconfigures (a process called retrogradation) into a less digestible crystalline form called ‘resistant starch’ (RS) with a lower GI. RS passes through our small intestine, into the large, and feeds our gut bacteria which makes them happy. We absorb fewer glucose molecules at a time and thus have a lower insulin spike. Raw oats and (cooked) cannellini beans also contain a lot of RS. Here is a well researched webpage with deeper detail.

I have included recipes for a yummy potato/pasta/rice/lentil salad, a bean salad HERE and a very quick no-cook Oatmeal-nut-dried fruit-chocolate cookie bite HERE. (these are darn good, if I must say so say myself.)

Tuesday Jan 19/2016: Glycemic Index (GI) – what the heck is it?

GI is a number assigned to carbohydrate-containing foods that describes their effect on your blood glucose level after eating them. Not surprisingly, eating straight glucose gives a GI of 100. In general, the more processed, fiberless, and sweetened it is, the higher GI it will have. Why do you care? Well, because high GI foods are associated with increased risk of Diabetes, Coronary Artery Disease, Macular Degeneration,Obesity and Cancer.  Yuck. Lower GI foods (>55) – you know what they are: REAL and FRESH foods,vegetables, fresh fruits, whole grains, stuff that takes some work to digest – those are the ones to eat. Avoid the white processed crap.   From Dr. Andrew Weil: his response.

 Tuesday Jan 12th/2016: Tomatoes – We like lycopene

Raw tomatoes are good for you (lotsa vit C), but cooked tomatoes are even more nutritious. After 30 minutes of simmering, the molecular trans- form of lycopene changes to cis-, a more more absorbable form. Lycopene is an even more potent antioxidant than vit C. This is why canned (picked at peak freshness and immediately cooked) tomato products are better for you than fresh, especially when they are not in season locally. Tomato paste is even more concentrated in lycopene. Cornell University research.

Monday Jan 11/2016: Garlic – get a press.

Garlic is good for you right? It’s even better if you crush it and let it sit for 10 minutes. Like a cold pack with two compartments that have to be crushed and mixed to get an endothermic reaction, garlic has compartments with 1) Alliin and 2) Alliinase, which have to be mashed together and let work for a while (10 min at room temperature) to create the wonder molecule Allicin – the much touted stuff with all the protective properties. Otherwise you are wasting the healing potential of the garlic. For a bit more reading, try here.